How is your network?

leadersPhil Willburn proposes 3 Key Network Principles for  High Performing Leaders and proposes a method:  Leader Network Diagnostic 

Structural Diversity (or open)  

Good networks are open. Open networks are those where the people you know are not all connected to each other. This creates what is called “structural diversity” of a leader’s network. Leaders with open networks are more likely to hear new information before others and are better able to merge dissimilar ideas and capitalize on opportunities that require this integration. They tend perform better, are promoted more rapidly, enjoy greater career mobility, and adapt to change more effectively

Cross Critical Boundaries (or diverse)

Good networks are diverse. Connections that cross critical boundaries in the organization provide additional diversity – and many of the same advantages of open networks. Much of the work of leadership involves working across vertical, horizontal, stakeholder, demographic, and geographic boundaries for group and organizational success. Individual leader’s network connections form the bridges that span these boundaries and allow for collective action. 

Quality Relationships  (or deep)

Good networks are deep. Leaders who build deep, quality relationships with others are able to exchange information, resources, and skills with individuals from different backgrounds. These deep relationships provide valuable perspective and resources, including social support and camaraderie in the workplace. Building high-quality relationships with others is estimated to be four times the predictor of performance than other network predictors.

Team | Bibliography

[B] Collective genius: The art and practice of leading innovation
Hill, L. A., Brandeau, G., Truelove, E., & Lineback, K. (2014). HBR Press.
Good teams know how to work collaboratively in solving problems, they know how to do guided learning through discovery, and they know how to integrate decision making in the process… + [TED]

[B] Monster Under the Bed
Davis, S. (2011). Simon and Schuster.
A consequence of the fact that knowledge grows non-stop is the need to reformulate the learning models. A good part of the skills and knowledge we use, particularly the digital one, has not been learned at school, but at home and at work. + [Res.]

[b] A Leader’s Network 
Willburn, P., & Cullen, K. (2013). Greensboro: Center for Creative Leadership.
The ability to lead is directly affected by the networks a leader builds, which influence how they share and receive new ideas. + [Note]

[p] Evidence for a Collective Intelligence Factor in the performance of human groups
Woolley, A. W., Chabris, C. F., Pentland, A., Hashmi, N., & Malone, T. W (2010). Science 330.
Researchers found evidence of a general “collective intelligence” factor that explains a group’s performance on a wide variety of tasks. + [Note]

[p] Creativity, clusters and the competitive advantage of cities
Martin, R., Florida, R., Pogue, M., & Mellander, C. (2015). Competitiveness Review, 25(5)
Combining the two lenses, industry and occupation, four major industrial- occupational categories may be identified. + [Note]

[p] Educating higher education students for innovative economies: what international data tell us
Avvisati, F., Jacotin, G., & Vincent-Lancrin, S. (2014). Tuning Journal for Higher Education, 1(1).
Design thinking has inspired various tertiary education institutions and programmes in the world to promote critical skills for the most innovative jobs. + [Note]

[n] Why CI is so important?
Huntingmammoths (2015)
Collective intelligence (CI) is not new, but like many other areas has gained momentum with technology.  + [Note]

Creative collective at Cirque du Soleil

cirque du soleilBoris Vekhovsky’s shares his experience at Cirque du Soleil in managing creative collaborative strategies, addressing one of the major issues for contemporary organizations – the transformation of a diversified collective of creative people into a performing creative collective. Creativity is not the exclusive privilege of a unique talented creator, but often needs a creativity leader to manage ideas coming from many different stakeholders in the creative venture, and “the key role of the creativity leader is to favour the expression of ideas by setting up a context of openness and respect, but also to sponsor and conduct discussions and debates about the creative and performing value of ideas. The creative leader is looking for the mobilization of diverse types of expertise in the evaluation of idea, and in complementing the idea with specific operational expertise. This challenge requires a complex balance of humbleness and authority. Humbleness plays an important role in being able to express and share half-baked insights, to play with them collectively in order to consolidate them, make them evolve, or discard them. Managing humbleness also means focusing on the attitude of people, being a role model in terms of listening and respectfully challenging an idea without invalidating the person expressing it”.

Setting the Stage for Collaborative Creative Leadership at Cirque du Soleil. Laurent Simon. Technology Innovation Management Review. July 2015. Link

Is creativity the driver of innovation?

porter florida marriage

Competitiveness Review published an interesting paper that “marries” Porter’s “traded clusters” concept with Florida’s perspective of “creative class”. Although the goodness of the combination may be obvious it results particularly illustrating the research approach.

Combining the two lenses, industry and occupation, researchers identifies four major industrial- occupational categories: Creative-in-traded, creative-in-local, routine-in-traded and routine-in-local. Economic growth and development is positively related to employment in the creative-in-traded category.

Creativity, clusters and the competitive advantage of cities. Roger Martin, Richard Florida, Melissa Pogue & Charlotta Mellander. Competitiveness Review. Vol. 25, 2015. pp. 482-496 Link

Team | i&R

i&R to help teams to become more efficient and effective

A team works with a degree of collective intelligence, and must share and manage its members’ weak and strong points when embarking on innovation projects. An appropriate approach to configure innovative teams has to provide criteria, to distribute roles, and manage activities across its members.

Working on TIM. [Team Intelligence Management]
Development and validation of a tool to help teams to know and manage collective intelligence.  Team Equilibrium Application


Former research

After so many years of working in teams, different in sizes and coats, having much more failures than successes, something has been learnt: We always try to get a better environment but it takes time and a lot of patience to manage egos, conflicts and misunderstandings.        

[cp] Non-Technical Skills in Chronic Care Healthcare Professionals: Applying Health Consensus in Collective Self-Assessment
Martí, T.,  Monguet JMª, Trejo, A., Escarrabill J.  (2015). Collective Intelligence 2015, University of Michigan
The goal was to test the Non-Technical Skills (NTS) model applying collective self-assessment among professionals involved in care of chronic patients. Two aspects were assessed: the current NTS level of the team and its potential for improvement. The final purpose of this model is to guide healthcare managers to design and prioritize (collective) training strategies for NTS. + [Paper]

TE agregated exagon design[cp] Team Equilibrium and Innovation Performance
Ferruzca, M., Monguet, JMª, Trejo, A., & Rodrigues, J. (2013). Design Management Symposium (TIDMS). Shenzhen: IEEE.
It may be taken for granted that there must be a balance of roles within teams to foster creativity. Team Equilibrium is a system that allows a group of people to share, compare and aggregate their profiles using the “six hats model”, proposed by de Bono. In a first empiric exploration, with a group of design students, it’s interesting to look at the aggregated hexagon of the 60 people highlighting the natural creative bias of the group. + [Paper]

Team [Annotated Bibliography]

How open, diverse and deep is your network?

The ability to lead is directly affected by the networks a leader builds. The networks leaders build affect how they share and receive new ideas. Connections can give leaders an edge. … more

Creative collective at Cirque du Soleil

Boris Vekhovsky’s shares his experience at Cirque du Soleil in managing creative collaborative strategies, addressing one of the major issues for contemporary organizations – the transformation of a diversified collective of creative people into a performing creative collective … more

Measuring Collective Intelligence

In two studies with 699 people, working in groups of two to five, researchers found converging evidence of a general “collective intelligence” factor that explains a group’s performance on a wide variety of tasks… more

Is creativity the new driver of innovation?

Combining the two lenses, industry and occupation, researchers identifies four major industrial- occupational categories: Creative-in-traded, creative-in-local, routine-in-traded and routine-in-local. more

Critical skills for innovative jobs

According with the work Educating higher education students for innovative economies: what international data tell us, the critical skills for the most innovative jobs are:
1. Come with news ideas/solutions
2. Willingness to question ideas
3. Present ideas in audience
4. Alertness to opportunities
5. Analytical thinking
6. Coordinate activities
7. Acquire new knowledge
8. Mobilise capacities of others 9. Make your meaning clear
10. Master of your own field
“Design thinking has inspired various tertiary education institutions and programmes in the world, be they degree-granting or not. Examples include the d.school at Stanford University (United States), the design factory at Aalto University (Finland), the i-school at Tokyo University (Japan), or the Master’s in innovation, design, entrepreneurship and arts (IDEA) at EMLyon business school and Ecole Centrale de Lyon (France), the Srishti School of Art, Design and Technology in Bangalore (India). Numerous other innovative initiatives try to develop all sets of skills for innovation by rethinking their teaching and make sure that students can get deeper and broader learning.”
“Given these developments and the skills needs of economies driven by innovation, a research agenda for the higher education community is to evaluate whether these programmes actually manage to develop a broader mix of skills for innovation and whether their graduates end up in highly innovative jobs….”
“… While the Bologna process has already led to a certain shift towards more skills-based approaches to higher education programmes,a new challenge is to remould the disciplinary culture of the faculties that remains predominant in higher education into a skillsbased culture.”